sewing cards

After several disastrous sessions of church directory photography, I knew something had to be done. It’s not like I could proclaim a do over. I won’t blame the whole debacle on my cameras—one a point-and-shoot Lumix, the other a hand-me-down SLR Pentax—but I’ve been taking pictures a long time and don’t remember ever having such lousy results. I’m afraid I don’t have the attention span required to do thorough research. I’m not even patient enough to narrow options in a Best Buy store. Cousin Helen Katherine just got a new camera; she’s even better than a current “Consumer Reports”! So an e-mail to her and a quick Google search resulted in the purchase of a new Nikon Coolpix S9100.

It arrived yesterday. Today’s mail brought a package from the aforementioned cousin. She’s been going through old family stuff that was passed down to her from our grandmother. It’s lovely to receive these artifacts in manageable portions to savor rather than store for some who-knows-when time.

New camera, family relics. Put them together and what do I get? Something to practice on and to share here!

I recently put up a picture of my grandma (my dad’s mother) wearing a mink around her neck.

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And somewhere in the bowels of this blog’s archives I’ve shown this favorite picture of my grandparents.

Grandma Nill - age 14

After receiving today’s package, I looked for (and found!) a picture of her as a 15-year-old girl, her first tintype. It was fun to have this frame of reference as I photographed these:

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It’s a book of sewing cards.

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It looks like she first drew the pictures on paper, poked holes along the lines, then sewed or embroidered them. According to the date, she was 13.

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Precious!

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One Response to sewing cards

  1. Joy says:

    How very cool! I have enjoyed reading her writings about our family history that Helen Katherine sent me a few years ago. I love getting a picture of what life was like for them more than 100 years ago. 🙂 Enjoy your camera!

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